8 HEALTH BENEFITS FROM PLAYING PIANO

Eight Ways in which Piano Benefits Your Mental and Physical Health

In our constant search for ways to improve our lives, we forget that it can be the things that we enjoy doing most which enrich us mentally and benefit our physical health. For instance, it has been scientifically proven that playing a musical instrument like Piano doesn’t only enhance your skills but also contributes to your health throughout your life.

THE PHYSICAL AND mental benefits of playing music have long been recognized. The piano, in particular, has been an unparalleled outlet for those seeking escape, creative expression, and simply fun and joy. Recent years have only seen more evidence of the benefits of piano come to light, linking music making to a healthy body, a healthy mind, and a healthy life.

 

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These eight health benefits of playing the piano enlisted below will make you add it to your bucket list:

1. It Relieves Stress

The fact that music from piano soothes the soul is known to us all but it also acts as a stress buster. Even if you give just a few minutes of your busy day to playing the piano, it can lower the blood pressure and make you feel much more positive. In fact, just being a part of piano recitals or playing in front of a few people can drive stage fright out of people.

2. Enhances Split Concentration

Since piano requires using both your hands doing different things for playing it, you might not be able to deal with it at first. Gradually, the art of split concentration becomes an integral part. This further helps you in coordinating your eyes and hands while playing. Thus, your concentration skills get developed, making you sharper.

3. Stimulates the Brain, improving Neural Connections.

Scientific studies show that music stimulates the brain in a way that no other activity does. Thus, playing a musical instrument like piano adds new neural connections developing some higher tiers in the brain. These improved neural connections have their fair share in benefiting at studies and other daily life chores of a person.

4. Strengthens Hand Muscles.

By maintaining the correct posture of hands and using the proper hand position while playing the piano makes your arms stronger. Even as you grow up and get older, your hands have stronger hand muscles compared to others. The piano is a great way of developing dexterity among children as well.

5. Improves the Language Skills

The aural awareness that is developed by playing the piano makes it easier for you to understand the sound patterns of foreign languages. It works wonders for kids who have trouble hearing in a noisy background and can fight dyslexia while it is still developing.

6. Improves Vocabulary and other Classroom skills

Learning to play the piano broadens the vocabulary and verbal sequencing skills of students. Since they are exposed to more words than the kids who do not learn music, their reading also improves automatically. All these factors lead to an overall better performance in the classroom.

7. It stimulates the growth hormones

The Human Growth Hormones or Hgh in the human body has been found to have an altered growth in children who play the piano. These growth hormones keep a person energetic and prevent issues like body ache and pain in the old age. Studies showed that students who took keyboard lessons had increased levels of human growth hormones than those who did not.

8. Helps Children accept Criticism Gracefully

Children who take piano lessons get continuous feedback’s and constructive criticisms from their teachers. This prepares them to accept criticism in a positive way, building them into individuals with stronger and better mental health. However, if a child does not take criticisms positively, it can lead to depression. In a way, piano lessons prove to inculcate important values that stay with people for their lifetime.

 

The power of music: how it can benefit health

“I think music in itself is healing,” American musician Billy Joel once said. “It’s an explosive expression of humanity. It’s something we are all touched by. No matter what culture we’re from, everyone loves music.” Most of us would wholeheartedly agree with this statement, and it is this universal bond with music that has led researchers across the globe to investigate its therapeutic potential.

musicWe can all think of at least one song that, when we hear it, triggers an emotional response. It might be a song that accompanied the first dance at your wedding, for example, or a song that reminds you of a difficult break-up or the loss of a loved one.

“We have a such a deep connection to music because it is ‘hardwired’ in our brains and bodies,” Barbara Else, senior advisor of policy and research at the American Music Therapy Association told Medical News Today. “The elements of music – rhythm, melody, etc. – are echoed in our physiology, functioning and being.”

Given the deep connection we have with music, it is perhaps unsurprising that numerous studies have shown it can benefit our mental health. A 2011 study by researchers from McGill University in Canada found that listening to music increases the amount of dopamine produced in the brain – a mood-enhancing chemical, making it a feasible treatment for depression.

And earlier this year, MNT reported on a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry that suggested listening to hip-hop music – particularly that from Kendrick Lamar – may help individuals to understand mental health disorders.

But increasingly, researchers are finding that the health benefits of music may go beyond mental health, and as a result, some health experts are calling for music therapy to be more widely incorporated into health care settings.

In this Spotlight, we take a closer look at some of the potential health benefits of music and look at whether, for some conditions, music could be used to improve – or even replace – current treatment strategies.

Reducing pain and anxiety

Bob Marley once sang: “One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain.” According to some studies, this statement may ring true.

Earlier this year, MNT reported on a study led by Brunel University in the UK that suggested music may reduce pain and anxiety for patients who have undergone surgery.

By analyzing 72 randomized controlled trials involving more than 7,000 patients who received surgery, researchers found those who were played music after their procedure reported feeling less pain and anxiety than those who did not listen to music, and they were also less likely to need pain medication.

This effect was even stronger for patients who got to choose the music they listened to. Talking to MNT, study leader Dr. Catharine Meads said:

If music was a drug, it would be marketable. […] Music is a noninvasive, safe, cheap intervention that should be available to everyone undergoing surgery.”

This study is just one of many hailing music for its effects against pain. In March 2014, researchers from Denmark found music may be beneficial for patients with fibromyalgia – a disorder that causes muscle and joint pain and fatigue.

Listening to calm, relaxing, self-chosen music “reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly” among 22 patients with fibromyalgia, according to the investigators.

But why does music appear to ease pain? While the exact mechanisms remain unclear, many researchers believe one reason is because listening to music triggers the release of opioids in the brain, the body’s natural pain relievers.

Dr. Daniel Levitin, of McGill University in Canada, and colleagues talk about this theory in a 2013 review, citing research that found people experienced less pleasure from listening to their favorite song when given Naltrexone – a drug that blocks opioid signals – suggesting music induces the release of opioids to ease pain.

An effective stress reliever

When feeling stressed, you may find listening to your favorite music makes you feel better – and there are numerous studies that support this effect.

A study reported by MNT last month, for example, found that infants remained calmer for longer when they were played music rather than spoken to – even when speech involved baby talk.

The study researchers, including Prof. Isabelle Peretz of the Center for Research on Brain, Music and Language at the University of Montreal in Canada, suggested the repetitive pattern of the music the infants listened to reduced distress, possibly by promoting “entertainment” – the ability of the body’s internal rhythms to synchronize with external rhythms, pulses or beats.

musicAnother study conducted in 2013 found that not only did listening to music help reduce pain and anxiety for children at the UK’s Great Ormond Street Hospital, it helped reduce stress – independent of social factors.

According to some researchers, music may help alleviate stress by lowering the body’s cortisol levels – the hormone released in response to stress.

The review by Dr. Levitin and colleagues, however, suggests this stress-relieving effect is dependent on what type of music one listens to, with relaxing music found most likely to lower cortisol levels.

Another mechanism by which music may alleviate stress is the effect it has on brainstem-mediated measures, according to Dr. Levitin and colleagues, such as pulse, heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature; again, the effect is dependent on the type of music listened to.

“Stimulating music produces increases in cardiovascular measures, whereas relaxing music produces decreases,” they explain. “[…] These effects are largely mediated by tempo: slow music and musical pauses are associated with a decrease in heart rate, respiration and blood pressure, and faster music with increases in these parameters.”

Music’s effect on heart rate and its potential as a stress reliever has led a number of researchers to believe music may also be effective for treating heart conditions.

Earlier this year, MNT reported on a study presented at the British Cardiology Society Conference in Manchester, UK, in which researchers from the UK’s University of Oxford found repeated musical phrases may help control heart rate and reduce blood pressure – though they noted more research is required in this area.

Music and memory

Certain songs have the ability to remind us of certain periods or events in our lives – some that make us smile, and some we would rather forget.

With this in mind, researchers are increasingly investigating whether music may aid memory recall.

 

music heals

n 2013, a study published in the journal Memory & Cognition enrolled 60 adults who were learning Hungarian. The adults were randomized to one of three learning tasks: speaking unfamiliar Hungarian phrases, speaking the same phrases in a rhythmic fashion or singing the phrases.

When asked to recall the phrases, the researchers found participants who sang the phrases had much higher recall accuracy than the other two groups. “These results suggest that a ‘listen-and-sing’ learning method can facilitate verbatim memory for spoken foreign language phrases,” say the authors.

Evidence from such studies has led researchers to suggest music may help memory recall for people with cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

A study published in the journal Gerontologist last year assessed the effect of music on memory recall in individuals with early-stage dementia.

For the research, 89 people with dementia and their caregivers were randomly assigned to either a 10-week singing coaching group, a 10-week music listening coaching group or usual care.

The results revealed that both the singing and music listening groups not only had better mood and overall well-being that the usual care group, but they demonstrated better episodic memory on cognitive assessments. The singing group also showed better working memory than the usual care group.

“Regular musical leisure activities can have long-term cognitive, emotional, and social benefits in mild/moderate dementia and could therefore be utilized in dementia care and rehabilitation,” the authors concluded.

Music therapy should be utilized more in health care settings

Based on the substantial evidence that music offers numerous health benefits, many experts are calling for greater utilization of music therapy within health care settings.

“Music therapists are poised and ready to assess, deliver and document music therapy treatment but also to consult with our colleagues (physicians, nurses, physiotherapists physical, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, etc.) to support the patient as part of the interdisciplinary team and care of the patient,” Else told MNT.

In addition, Else believes that music therapy could offer an alternative treatment option for some conditions – such as tension headaches.

“A more complicated case example I can think of, although more rare, is for certain persons who experience seizure activity associated with music and auditory exposures – often high-frequency sounds and rhythmic intensity,” she said.

“Customized music therapy interventions to cope with the offending acoustic exposures can support stabilization of the patient’s symptoms and may, in turn, result in a medication reduction or taper,” she continued.

Based on the research to date, there is certainly evidence that we have much more than just an emotional connection with music. So the next time you put on your favorite track, have a little dance around safe in the knowledge that you are likely to be reaping some health benefits.

Music Therapy as an Effective Tool in Addiction Recovery

Grab a guitar or write a song — music therapy is proven to help you get and stay sober in addiction recovery.

Music Therapy

Music is a powerful medium that many of us rely on as a part of our day-to-day experiences. It is no surprise then that music therapy has taken the power of music and applied it in specific ways to facilitate healing and growth. While the benefits of music therapy are wide ranging, it can be a particularly useful tool to help people overcome addictions.

What is Music Therapy?

Music therapy is the use of music as a tool within a therapeutic relationship to help facilitate physical, emotional, cognitive, and social change and growth. Qualified music therapists design interventions that are based on an individual’s needs, which may include creating, singing, moving to, and/or listening to music.

Research supports music therapy as an effective method to help increase people’s motivation and engagement in treatment, provide emotional support, and provide an alternative outlet for expressing feelings. These benefits, along with many others, are what makes music therapy an effective tool to help people recover from addictions.

How can Music Therapy aid Addiction Recovery?

For addiction treatment to be most effective it should be holistic, which means it should address the biological, psychological, and social factors that have contributed to the disorder. Music therapy can provide an adjunct to other therapies traditionally used to treat addiction. By integrating music into therapy clients can experience a wide range of benefits that support their overall recovery, including the following:

Improves ability to recognise and accept different emotions.

When actively addicted to drugs, alcohol, or processes, people build up defence mechanisms such as rationalising, minimising, denying, and lying in order to continue their behaviour and hide from their emotions. The creative nature of music therapy contrasts these fixed ways of thinking and can help addicts break through their rigid thinking patterns.

Music also has a powerful impact on our emotional states and can provide indirect access to different emotions. Music therapy, especially listening to and discussing music and its lyrics, can help people safely explore emotions and identify a wider range of emotional states. Accessing emotions indirectly through music can provide a more comfortable starting point for discussing and accepting a variety of different feelings.

Promotes self-expression and self-awareness.

Self-expression often precedes self-awareness and both are necessary for entering long-term recovery. Making music, song writing, or choosing to listen to different songs can help clients express the emotions they are beginning to feel once they get sober, instead of trying to escape from these feelings through the use of drugs and alcohol.

Having a means of self-expression in turn helps develop self-awareness. This can lead clients to a better understanding about how the disease of addiction impacted their lives, and the choices they have in taking responsibility for their own recovery.

Increases self-esteem.

Low self-esteem is something many addicts struggle with long after they embrace sobriety. Finding ways to increase feelings of self-worth will significantly enhance a person’s recovery and help prevent relapse. There are many ways music therapy can accomplish this. One is by giving people an outlet to creating something they feel good about. Music can also contribute to feelings of connectedness with others, which lets us know we are not so different and alone.

Facilitates relaxation and stress reduction.

Stress can be a recovering addict’s worst enemy. Lack of stress management and coping skills is one reason people turn to drugs and alcohol in the first place, and why many people relapse. When people listen to music, it can help calm their nerves and de-stress, but the trick is finding music that is relaxing for you. Singing, writing, or learning to play music can also become a healthy hobby that you can use to keep your life balanced, as well as a creative outlet to turn to in times of stress.

Making music with the help of a music therapist while in an alcohol and drug rehab can provide the therapeutic benefits described above. There are also many practical ways that recovering addicts can get involved with music to enhance their recovery.

Ways You can use Music to Enhance Your Recovery

While music therapy is a specific type of treatment that is facilitated by trained music therapists, many people use music as a way to bring joy and healing into their life even without professional assistance. Many famous musicians such as Macklemore have used their music as a way to keep themselves motivated in their sobriety and express their thoughts and feelings surrounding addiction.

It is important to note that not all music will be helpful for your recovery. Because music can stir up powerful feelings, songs that remind you of drinking or using drugs can be triggering and should be avoided, especially in early recovery. With that being said, here are a few ways you can incorporate music into your life to help you stay sober in the long term:

Start drumming.

Drumming is one way to make music that has been shown to provide many benefits to recovering addicts, including stress reduction and providing feelings of pleasure. Joining a drum circle can help you feel connected to others and give you a positive way to spend free time.

Create your own motivational playlists.

Creating playlists is fun and now easier than ever. Create playlists of songs you enjoy around certain themes, such as songs for relaxation and songs to motivate you to exercise.

Meditate with music.

Meditation has been shown to help people in recovery, but it can be difficult to do at first. Listening to certain music can help you calm the mind and act as a buffer for meditation practice when first starting out.

Write a song. (Even if you do not share it with anyone.)

Keeping a journal is another recovery practice that many people find helpful to get out their thoughts and feelings. Try using your journal as a place to experiment with writing your own poems or songs.

Many people have used music and music therapy to help them work through their addictions and achieve long-term recovery. Whether with the help of a music therapist or through using music on your own, there is no doubt that music is a powerful tool for growth and healing in addiction recovery.

10 Songs Steve Jobs Used to Train His Brain

 

 

Steve Jobs probably used these recordings to alter his mental state, change his moods, and keep himself creative.

Music is many things to many people, but to entrepreneurs it can be an essential success tool. According to Dr. Victoria Williamson of Goldsmith’s College, London, “Brain imaging studies have shown that various parts of the brain may be activated by a piece of music.”

In other words, you can use specific pieces of music to “program” your brain to think and feel in specific ways.

Not long before his untimely death, Steve Jobs accidentally revealed his favorite musicduring a product demonstration. Since Jobs used meditation to get creative, it’s highly likely he also used music to alter his moods and states of consciousness.

With that in mind, here are the iconic songs that inspired Steve Jobs and might inspire you, too:

1. “Imagine” (John Lennon)

Jobs believed that his products would and could make the world a better place, so is it any surprise that he was inspired by Lennon’s utopian masterpiece?

 

 

2. “Hard Headed Woman” (Cat Stevens)

This song probably triggered the emotions of support and respect that Jobs associated his wife, Laurene Powell Jobs, an executive and philanthropist in her own right.

3. “Highway 61 Revisited” (Bob Dylan)

This quick-paced, irony-laced number perfectly captures the wry humor that Jobs exhibited when presenting his “insanely great” products to the world.

4. The Goldberg Variations (J.S. Bach)

Bach and Jobs were both known for their ability to achieve near-perfect simplicity even when dealing with the complexities of melody or technology (respectively).

5. “Truckin'” (The Grateful Dead)

Like most high tech executives, Steve Jobs often traveled on business. This song might well have inspired Jobs to remain creative during the “long strange trip it’s been.”

6. “Late for the Sky” (Jackson Browne)

This thoughtful ballad speaks of lost opportunities and making the most of your life. Perhaps Jobs used this song to gain balance and perspective during difficult times.

7. “Blue in Green” (Miles Davis)

This classic number by the world’s greatest jazz trumpeter is the perfect music to get your mind relaxed and calmed after a long, hard day at work.

 

8. “Beast of Burden” (The Rolling Stones)

The classic Stones tune is about remaining an individual despite outside pressure to be something that you’re not.

 

9.”Won’t Get Fooled Again” (The Who)

Job made mistakes in his career but (significantly) never made the same mistake twice. With that in mind, this might have been his business strategy them song.

10. “Blowin’ in the Wind” (Peter, Paul & Mary)

If Lennon’s “Imagine” represented the world as Jobs would have liked it to be, this song (written by Bob Dylan) no doubt reminded him of what still remained to be accomplished.

79 Songs About Soldiers and Veterans

There is a playlist for just about any situation and is on a mission to unite and entertain the world through song.

Make a playlist about soldiers and veterans to honor those who protect your liberty.  We have a long list of pop, rock, metal, and country songs to get you started.

Make a playlist about soldiers and veterans to honor those who protect your liberty. We have a long list of pop, rock, metal, and country songs to get you started. 

Soldiers Put It All on the Line for Freedom

Chances are that you have a veteran or active military member in your social network. But have you stopped to truly listen to their story and reflect on what their contributions mean to your freedom?

Men and women in uniform have put it all on the line for their country, setting aside their personal lives, often at great expense to their families and themselves. How often do you express your gratitude for their sacrifices?

Recognize veterans’ heroic contributions to preserving liberty and freedom with a custom playlist. Here’s a long list of pop, rock, and country songs about military personnel. You don’t have to wait until Veterans Day, Memorial Day, or Fourth of July to reflect on their heroism.

1. “For You” by Keith Urban

The soldier in this heartrending 2012 hit has a wife and an unborn child who wait for him at home. But in the heat of combat, with smoke, fire, and bullets flying, he doesn’t think twice about taking a bullet for his fellow soldier. He knows this sacrifice is his duty and that others would do the same for him. That’s the heroism of our men and women in uniform.

 

 

2. “American Soldier” by Toby Keith

Toby Keith drew fire from fans when he appeared at Donald Trump’s pre-inauguration concert at the Lincoln Memorial and sang this 2003 country hit. It describes an American soldier—a family man, a hard worker, steady, brave, honorable, and good under pressure. In answering critics, the singer noted that he had appeared at the inauguration events of both George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

3. “8th of November” by Big & Rich

This poignant 2005 country song tells the story of Niles Harris, a 19-year-old boy from Deadwood, South Dakota, who hugged his mother goodbye as he left home for the army to fight during the Vietnam War. Just a few months later, on November 8, 1965, he encountered an epic battle he would remember the rest of his life.

Forty-eight fellow soldiers died in combat that day, and Niles was left with shrapnel in his leg as a reminder of their sacrifice. Decades later, he still honors their service on the 8th of November by putting on a suit and tie.

In case you’re wondering … yes, Niles is indeed real.

4. “Wake Me Up When September Ends” by Green Day

In this haunting 2005 rock hit describing loss, the narrator is going through a difficult time and mourns his innocence. Although the song was written about the passing of Green Day lead lead singer’s father, its video depicts a couple separate by the Iraq War.

Studies suggest that among soldiers who served in Iraq and Afganistan, about one in five suffer post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).  Among Vietnam Era veterans, as many as 80% reported symptoms when interviewed 20-25 years after Vietnam.

Studies suggest that among soldiers who served in Iraq and Afganistan, about one in five suffer post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Among Vietnam Era veterans, as many as 80% reported symptoms when interviewed 20-25 years after Vietnam

5. “Warrior” by Kid Rock

The National Guard used this 2008 rock song by Kid Rock as a recruitment tool. It features a narrator who celebrates his status as a citizen soldier. He’s ready to go when liberty calls because he understands that freedom isn’t free.

6. “Indestructible” by Disturbed

Meant to be a battle anthem to encourage American soldiers and pump them up as they prepare for combat, this 2008 hard rock song is enough to make anyone feel unassailable. It speaks of no hesitation, a sworn duty to protect, and the honor of returning home victorious.

7. “Didn’t I” by Montgomery Gentry

The 2002 movie We Were Soldiers featured this moving country song on its soundtrack. The song describes a Vietnam era veteran who returns home from war only to face judgment and criticism instead of appreciation for his service.

Rhetorically, the veteran asks whether he burned and bled enough and endured enough physical and emotional pain to warrant a better homecoming. About 9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the Vietnam era (1964 to 1975). Many faced protests, indifference, and a dearth of resource assistance with reintegrating into American society after the war.

Veterans Day, celebrated November 11, honors service members both alive and deceased.  Memorial Day, celebrated the last Monday of May, honors military members who died while serving their country.

Veterans Day, celebrated November 11, honors service members both alive and deceased. Memorial Day, celebrated the last Monday of May, honors military members who died while serving their country.

8. “‘Til The Last Shot’s Fired” by Trace Adkins

This country song from 2008 commemorates soldiers from the American Civil War to World War II to Vietnam. The nature of the conflict may have been different, but the horror of war is the same. The narrator urges us all to say a prayer for peace.

9. “Brothers” by Dean Brody

Brothers can be counted on, although they don’t always express their emotions well verbally. That’s the message behind this tender 2009 country song that shares memories from the narrator’s childhood.

A young boy’s older brother is leaving for the military, and at first the child preferred not to say goodbye, thinking that he could deny his brother’s leaving away. At the last moment, the boy runs to his brother and offers to clean his room, give him his rookie Joe DiMaggio card, anything to prevent his departure.

Two years later, the soldier returns in a wheelchair and says that he’s sorry that his younger sibling has to push him home. The younger brother replies, “This is what brothers are for.

10. “Fortunate Son” by Creedence Clearwater Revival

Recognized by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant,” this seminal 1969 rock song is also one of Rolling Stonemagazine’s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”

During the Vietnam era, “Fortunate Son” was an anti-war anthem that was used to express rebuke for people who supported war but didn’t have to bear its burdens, either financially or by serving. About three-fourths of the military personnel who served in Vietnam were from lower middle/working class backgrounds.

11. “Citizen Soldier” by 3 Doors Down

This 2007 rock song pays tribute to the National Guard:

Hope and pray that you’ll never need me,
But rest assured I will not let you down.
I’ll walk beside you but you may not see me,
The strongest among you may not wear a crown.

It was used as a part of the National Guard’s recruiting campaign and references the vital role that the Guard plays in both homeland security and national defense.

America’s citizen soldiers may be activated to respond to natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, and wildfires. They may also be deployed to help when peace is threatened by riots, civil unrest and terrorist events.

12. “The Pride” by Five Finger Death Punch

This high energy 2011 metal song conveys an American soldier’s strength, pride, and unwavering readiness to defend, whatever the cost. In rapid succession, the song lists many iconic elements of American culture to represent all that a soldier protects when he or she serves our country. Our freedom, values and way of life hangs in the balance when troops are called to defend our country.

13. “Diamond Eyes (Boom-Lay Boom-Lay Boom)” by Shinedown

Written for the 2010 movie The Expendables, this rock song expresses the intensity of being on the front line of combat. With nothing to lose, a soldier operates on sheer adrenaline and a “fist first” mentality, thinking quickly in a brutal high-stakes battle.

14. “Letters From Home” by John Michael Montgomery

Sometimes simple things such as letters can do wonders to boost soldier morale. In this 2004 country song, a young soldier receives a letter from his mother about the details of everyday life back at home. He also gets a love letter from his fiance and a brief letter from his stoic dad that shares how proud he is of his son. Each helps to spur him on amidst the terrible uncertainty that is war.

15. “Hey Brother” by Avicci

This 2013 pop song expresses the devotion felt between siblings and others who still feel intensely connected when one of them is far away. Although separated by distance, they sense when the other is lonely or in danger:

Oh, if the sky comes falling down, for you
There’s nothing in this world I wouldn’t do.

16. “Courtesy Of The Red, White And Blue (The Angry American)” by Toby Keith

After 9/11, this country song became a rousing anthem for the guys and gals in uniform. Full of bravado, the 2002 song features a narrator fondly recalling his war hero father. Then he launches into a promise of American vengeance for the sucker punch terrorist attack on 9/11:

Justice will be served
And the battle will rage
This big dog will fight
When you rattle his cage
And you’ll be sorry that you messed with
The U.S. of A.
`Cause we`ll put a boot in your a*s
It`s the American way

17. “Some Gave All” by Billy Ray Cyrus

The narrator in this touching 1992 country hit recalls a friend who matured dramatically after his combat experiences. The friend remarked that when you think of your liberty, think of him as well as other veterans. The veteran explained to the narrator that “All gave some; some gave all

Fifteen U.S. Presidents have not served in the military:  Trump, Obama, Clinton, FDR, Hoover, Coolidge, Harding, Wilson, Taft, Cleveland, Fillmore, Van Buren, John Quincy Adams, Jefferson, and John Adams.

Fifteen U.S. Presidents have not served in the military: Trump, Obama, Clinton, FDR, Hoover, Coolidge, Harding, Wilson, Taft, Cleveland, Fillmore, Van Buren, John Quincy Adams, Jefferson, and John Adams.

18. “Heaven Was Needing a Hero” by Jo Dee Messina

In this 2010 country song, the sweetheart of a fallen soldier visits his grave. Although she always told him that he wouldn’t be called home until it was his time, she justifies his untimely death as due to heaven’s needing a hero.

The Veterans Administration estimates that over 7% of all living Americans has served in the military at some point in their lives.

The Veterans Administration estimates that over 7% of all living Americans has served in the military at some point in their lives.

19. “Letters from the Garden of Stone” by Everlast

A combat soldier sits by the moonlight readying himself for battle at daylight in this 2008 rock song. At first, he shows little emotion about what he has to do — kill or be killed. He tries to push back thoughts of family members, however the more their memories begin to creep in, the more he questions whether he’s doing the right thing fighting.

20. “The Other Little Soldier” by Josh Gracin

Feel the lump in your throat form as you listen to this country tune from 2004. It describes a small boy who plays dress up in his dad’s military uniform. Even though he doesn’t have the maturity to understand what his father is fighting for, the child is proud and wants to grow up just like his role model.

When Uncle Sam calls his dad to combat, sadly, his dad returns in a flag-draped casket. The little boy gives his father one last goodbye salute. This child represents the legion of military family members who also make sacrifices in wartime and in peace

There are seven uniformed branches of the U.S. military:  Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

There are seven uniformed branches of the U.S. military: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

Even More Songs About Soldiers and Veterans

Song
Artist
Year Released
21. Travelin’ Soldier
Dixie Chicks
2002
22. Riding with Private Malone
David Ball
2001
23. Goodnight Saigon
Billy Joel
1982
24. I Want You to Live
George Canyon
2007
25. If I Don’t Make It Back
Tracy Lawrence
2005
26. If You’re Reading This
Tim McGraw
2007
27. Arlington
Trace Adkins
2005
28. Come Home Soon
SHeDaisy
2004
29. 50,000 Names Carved in the Wall
George Jones
2001
30. Belleau Wood
Garth Brooks
1997
31. I Just Came Back (from a War)
Darryl Worley
2006
32. Soldiers and Jesus
James Otto
2010
33. I Drive Your Truck
Lee Brice
2012
34. The Ballad of the Green Berets
Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler
1966
35. Remember the Heroes
Sammy Hagar
1982
36. Sam Stone
John Prine
1971
37. Who You’d Be Today
Kenny Chesney
2005
38. One Hell of an Amen
Brantley Gilbert
2014
39. Fallen Soldier
Nathan Fair
2013
40. Once I Was
Tim Buckley
1967
41. Orange Crush
R.E.M.
1988
42. I Was Only 19
Redgum
1983
43. Still a Soldier
Trace Adkins
2017
44. Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town
Kenny Rogers and The First Edition
1969
45. War Is Hell (On the Homefront Too)
T.G. Sheppard
1982
46. More Than a Name on a Wall
The Statler Brothers
1989
47. Castle of Glass
Linkin Park
2013
48. Wrong Side of Heaven
Five Finger Death Punch
2013
49. Rooster
Alice in Chains
1993
50. For Whom the Bell Tolls
Metallica
1984
51. I Remember (It’s Happening Again)
Griffin House
2008
52. Camoflague
Stan Ridgway
1986
53. Just a Dream
Carrie Underwood
2008
54. 19
Paul Hardcastle
1985
55. Soldier Boy
The Shirelles
1962
56. Airborne
Nina Lee
2017
57. Dress Blues
Zac Brown Band
2015
58. People Back Home
Florida Georgia Line
2012
59. If Not Me
Craig Morgan
2013
60. In the Navy
Village People
1979
61. Navy Blue
Diane Renay
1963
62. Mother’s Pride
George Michael
1990
63. Walking on a This Line
Huey Lewis
1984
64. Home of the Brave
Toto
1988
65. In My Blood
Black Stone Cherry
2011
66. Dear John
Producers
1982
67. Your Heart Belongs to Me
The Supremes
1962
68. Pass the Ammo
Moonshine Bandits
2015
69. American Pride
Moonshine Bandits
2011
70. Letters from Home
Mark Schultz
2014
71. Angel Flight
Radney Foster and the Confessions
2009
72. Hero Of War
Rise Against
2009
73. Out of Harm’s Way
Journey
2005
74. The Ballad of Penny Evans
Steve Goodman
1976
75. Soldiers
Otherwise
2012
76. Gunslinger
Avenged Sevenfold
2007
77. Stop When You See a Uniform
Buddy Brown
2013
78. An Honor to Serve
Ray Boltz
1998
79. Two Soldiers Coming Home
Lori McKenna
2012

 

Why are musicians more likely to suffer from depression?

Creative artists are fifth in the top 10 professions with high rates of depressive illness. But does depression attract them to the job? Or does the job make them depressed?

Health.com recently published a top 10 of professions with the highest rate of depression– one chart most artists wouldn’t want to be on. However, people working in the arts are fifth most likely to suffer from depression, with around 9% of them reporting a major depressive episode in the previous year. It appears carving out a career as a musician isn’t just perilous when it comes to earning a living – it can also cause damage to your physical and mental health. Musicians supplementing their income by waiting tables would rate even higher on the chart, as food service staff are second most prone to depression.

You know it the second you hear the first notes. It’s that one special song that makes your spine tingle. You can feel the tears welling up in your eyes.

How does that happen? Only seven notes can come together to form a soul-moving melody that can break your heart, make you cry, and bring back buried, long-forgotten memories.

Music is powerful.

 

Image result for depression photo

1. Music helps you work through your problems

Often during your darkest nights, you can’t find a way through the muddy alleyways of your mind. Good news! Don’t just lie there, turn on Google play and let the music flow into you. If you cry, that’s OK. Tears represent feelings that must be expressed. Feeling is healing.

Music helps you express your emotions. It’s melodic encouragement that helps you let go of suppressed feelings. A study published in the British Journal showed that music is cathartic, especially drumming. You didn’t need a medical study to prove that. You discovered that yourself when you were a 4 year-old banging on your mother’s pots and pans.

2. Music inspires creativity

Do you need to write a blog, run faster on the treadmill, or design a new website but can’t because you’re feeling uninspired? Pump up the jam. Music will motivate you. Go ahead, try to sit still while listening to Avicii sing Wake Me Up, it’s just not possible.

Finnish researchers found that the mind-wandering mode goes into action when your brain processes a song, thus inspiring creativity. These rewards don’t only happen to artists: Techies also benefit from the relaxing effect of music.

Professor Gold (one of the Finnish researchers) who conducted the study said, “Our trial has shown that music therapy, when added to standard care including medication, psychotherapy and counseling, helps people to improve their levels of depression and anxiety. Music therapy has specific qualities that allow people to express themselves and interact in a non-verbal way – even in situations when they cannot find the words to describe their inner experiences.”

3. Music affects your breathing

Music has the power to speed up your heartbeats or slow down your breathing. Musicians beware! You respond differently than the rest of us.

Anyone can feel the music. Your foot starts tapping as your body sways from side to side. Who hasn’t been to a concert when you felt the bass beating in your chest? There is scientific proof behind it.

A slow, meditative tempo has a relaxing effect slowing your heart rate and breathing while faster music with an upbeat tempo speeds up your heart rate and respiration.

You are can be in charge of your body, simply by choosing which songs you listen to. Next time you’re feeling anxious, when your heart starts to race, grab your headset and listen to Zen Garden.

4. Music can reduce blood pressure

Here’s the prescription: Listen to classical, Celtic or reggae music 30 minutes a day to lower your blood pressure. According to the American Society of Hypertension, research shows this simple prescription might significantly reduce high blood pressure.

In a report from Dr. Peter Sleight at the University of Oxford, research has shown “music can alleviate stress, improve athletic performance, improve movement in neurologically impaired patients with stroke or Parkinson’s disease, and even boost milk production in cattle.”

Don’t throw away your medication yet, but music is certainly an easier pill to take.


5. Music is used to treat addiction

Music therapy can be of great value in treating addiction. It is certainly not enough by itself to help someone recover from substance abuse, but it can be a useful tool in the treatment process.

Addiction is a painful disease that affects the entire family and circle of friends. Making the decision to enter rehab is the first step towards recovery. Help is available and new methods of treatment are continually being discovered.

Thamkrabok is a Buddhist temple in Thailand offering free treatment to for addiction. Music plays an important role at the temple because of its therapeutic powers. The monks of Thamkrabok even have their own recording studio.  Tim Arnold, the UK musician made a whole album there.

Sobriety is an emotional roller coaster. Music (either playing it or listening to it) may help people get rid of some of their destructive emotions.

6. Music might prevent suicide

The sound of music is incredibly powerful. It can even prevent suicide.

IN 1997, DMC aka Darrell McDaniels, of Run DMC, was at the top of the charts. While touring he fell into a negative downward spiral, thinking Is this all there is?

He was serious. At that moment, he made a decision to commit suicide when he got home.

Staring at the walls in a cold hotel room, Sarah McLachlan’s song “Angel” came on the radio. You know it’s power. It makes you cry and want to run out and adopt one of those sad animals in the SPCA commercial.

It’s hard to believe, but that song changed his suicide plan. He became a huge fan of Sarah McLachlan. Soon after, he found out he was adopted, which gave his life new meaning.

After DMC trashed his suicide plan, he made a new plan to use his music and fame to decided to promote adoption and help foster kids. He even made a documentary to promote his worthy cause.

7. Music in the operating room

Did you know doctors have a specific playlist for different types of surgery?

 Anthony Youn, M.D. cites a study published in “Surgical Endoscopy” that found classical music affected surgeons more positively than hard rock or heavy metal.

Oddly, another study published by “Surgical Innovation” noted surgeons’ performances benefitted most from hip-hop and reggae the music. Go figure!

Dr. Youn says, “It probably comes down to taste, with surgeons finding comfort and inspiration working to the music they like to hear.”

Doctors aren’t the only ones affected. Several studies show that patients appear more relaxed, require less anesthesia, and recover quicker when physicians play tunes in the OR.

Nearly 80% of operating room support staff believed music had a positive effect on their work as well. I wonder if the remaining 20% wear noise-cancelling headphones.

Who knows what the future of the OR will bring? Maybe there’ll be a DJ taking requests for your favorite spins.

8.  Music reduces pain

Whether it’s Sam Smith, Lady Gaga, or Jason Mraz, the lyrics and melodies they write and sing can be effective therapy for managing pain. According to a paper in the UK-based Journal of Advanced Nursing, listening to music can reduce chronic pain from a range of painful conditions, including osteoarthritis, disc problems and rheumatoid arthritis, by up to 21%. That’s a lot when you’re hurting.

Music is a distraction that gives the patient a sense of control. Music causes the body to release endorphins, which counteract pain.

9. Music jars your memory

Beware: Handle music with care. Some songs put you in a time machine and set you back to painful times. Hopefully, when you get there, you will remember the lessons you learned, see how much you have grown and how much better you are doing since leaving those sad times behind you. Leaving those memories allows you to open your heart to new adventures.

So next time you make your playlist, choose carefully, those songs are going deep into your soul. They might inspire you to create a new start-up, stop drinking so much, become a triathete, or fall in love.

There’s no doubt about it. Those seven notes can change your life.

 

Meet Fowler Associates Team – Leadership BIOS

WELCOME TO FA HOSPITALITY, We Really Can Make The Difference

At FA HOSPITALITY, experience matters. We believe in driving results for clients through a proven, balanced scorecard approach to hospitality management. Our performance-based culture creates an atmosphere where talented people are provided with the tools, processes and guidance to deliver excellence in hotel operations, profitability, revenue management, finance and guest service.

                          FA Hospitality

Building value. Realizing potential. Sustaining profitability. At FA HOSPITALITY (“Associate”), a Northern California based hotel management company, our success is guided by one simple maxim: Treat each problem, decision, and opportunity as if the result affects us personally. It’s an effective approach – and we’ve demonstrated its value by yielding substantial success as owners and operators of hotels, office, retail, and residential properties. Our sense of personal responsibility inspires accessibility, quick response and a hands-on management style.

Jack Jones – CEO

Jack Jones

A seasoned hotel operator of nearly 35 years, Jack Jones oversees all aspects of operations for all of FA Hospitality’s lifestyle brands, from supporting the company’s active commitment to operational excellence to facilitating the collaborative team effort between operations, sales, marketing and revenue management for its hotels, resorts and restaurants. Prior to becoming an executive recruiter, Jack was a General Manager managing various branded hotels such as Marriott, Hilton, Holiday Inn and Residence Inn.

Jack Jones paints a picture of success for every challenge that comes his way with the mantra: “Believe in your mind that you can, and you will.”  The impact of his 30-year career in the hospitality industry has spanned continents through his senior leadership positions at some of the world’s most well-known hotel companies.

Jack believes the most effective leaders surround themselves with outstanding talent who possess unwavering managerial courage and the desire to succeed beyond expectations. And last but certainly not least, his three keys to success: 1) a sharp wit, 2) the ability to consider alternative view points and 3) a heavy dose of rock n’ roll now and then.

Arnel Mojica – Vice President Finance

Arnel Mojica

Arnel Mojica, Executive Vice President, Finance, is responsible for the accounting and finance function for Montage International. In addition, Mr. Mojica oversees internal audit, risk management, legal administration, IT, and owner relations.

Mr. Mojica provides strategic leadership and vision to the finance discipline while executing the company’s growth strategies and identifying opportunities to enhance FA Hospitality’s organization, systems and processes

Arnel is responsible for safeguarding hotel assets, preparing all financial Statements, along with establishing and implementing policies and procedures to ensure internal controls for all FA Hospitality properties in the US. She oversees the corporate accounting team which includes regional controllers, human resources, accounts receivable and accounts payable. Additionally, Arnel will assume the leadership responsibilities for planning, implementing, managing, and controlling all enterprise-wide finance, accounting, payroll, and information systems related strategies.

Arnel will oversee the continued development of our accounting and finance departments. He will center his focus on the development of his team leaders by providing direction and accountability for the management and reporting of the financial performance as well as the improvement of our accounting and finance disciplines.

Eric Sted – Vice President Sales Select Hotels

Mr. Eric Sted joined FA Hospitality in April of 2018. He has over 22 years of cumulative experience in the hospitality industry, including roles at full-service, extended stay, and select-service properties with Marriott, Starwood and Hilton brands. His experience includes corporate and social catering sales, wedding planning, group and transient sales, oversight of hotel openings, and the facilitating of training classes

As Vice President of Sales Select Hotels at FA Hospitality, Eric Sted is responsible for aligning the human resources function as a strategic partner providing direction for operational needs. Mr. Sted brings to her role a wealth of experience in human resources with over 22 years of expertise and has worked with numerous Fortune 500 clients in the hospitality industry. He has placed top talent at the mid to executive level management throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and Caribbean and successfully led recruiting teams throughout the country.

Eric is responsible for directing the optimization and execution of all Human Resources programs specific to property level new hire tools and processes, leading new hire General Manager orientation and training, overseeing the Excellence Development Process improvements and roll out, leading the design and delivery of FA Hospitality Leadership Conferences, and leading the on-boarding and off-boarding HR processes for new properties and property sales.

Finding a leader that aligns with the purpose, values and mission of your organization is hard. How we at FA Hospitality Search deliver is simple – and totally unique – in the search industry: we connect the most purpose-aligned, proven leaders to growing organizations with missions and cultures that matter.

Eric and his team of professionals Search is the leading executive search and strategy company that purpose-based organizations turn to for finding and hiring deeply aligned, high-performing, exceptional leaders that multiply their teams. We believe that the most transformational, impact-oriented leaders are found through a shared purpose with the hiring organization. Period.

Barry Renker – Vice President Operations

Barry Renker has over 30 years the hospitality industry having worked with a wide range of Brands, ownerships and assets. He has held executive operations and senior management positions with Marriott and Starwood Hotels and Resorts. Barry also worked for Pyramid Hotel Group and Four Corners Hospitality and held General Manager positions to furthering his skills and experiences.

Barry has demonstrated a career record of consistently leading top-brand hotels to exceptional performance through focus on quality and top-line revenue to drive profitability, market penetration, brand development, and associate and guest satisfaction. Barry has a history of providing effective and strategic leadership, promoting team development and has the capacity to build and create a competitive advantage resulting in superior quality, value and service.

As a tenured operator; Barry is an active supporter of the hotels and their teams but is always challenging the leaders under his charge to push the envelope. Coaching to improve the eyes of the operators and to also have the head of an owner, with the goal to always drive results and deliver a balanced scorecard. As comfortable with clients as he is with line staff in all positions, Barry understands the importance of relationships as well as results and works to ensure he is modeling behaviors to improve the caliber of leadership within the organizations where he has served.

 

 

The Armenian Species

Gossip: you can’t avoid it. And maybe, you shouldn’t want to. Scientists have argued that gossip is an important tool for social cohesion and information transmission, allowing us to function more effectively in an ever-larger society.  Moreover, it’s an important tool for effective learning: it can give us a sense of who would make a good ally—or who we should avoid—even in the absence of direct contact

 

Jealousy is the fear of comparison. Max Frisch.

Armenians: what can I say.  They make a competition out of who can outdo the other with the most wittiest license plate, the most expensive car, the biggest house, etc. The biggest, the most, the fastest – in short, if they don’t win the word ending in “est,” they don’t feel well that day.

In talking behind each other’s’ back, they are very skilled.  Armenians call it “something to chew on.”  We call it gossip.  And they’re always chewing… If you know what I mean.

Gossip is all around us. What is the role of gossip in a community? Is it good or bad for life in common?

 

“Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.”
― Henry Thomas Buckle

 

And this is very similar to another trait they call “yergoo-yeress-antzootyoon.”  I think Shakespeare had Armenians in mind when he wrote, “look thy flower but be thy serpent underneath.’  For you see, Armenians have the gift of putting you at ease and making you smile with their charm and wit, of making you the most important person in the room, but when you are no longer there –  like a serpent they sting, they bite and now  you’re the butt of all their jokes and the villain in every story. What happened to all the love you ask?  You’ were lulled by the Armenian peacock’s feathers and song but ended being covered in all of their guano.

If they need help, they have no problem in asking for it.  Your car, your time, your tools and so on, are all their’s for the asking. If you spent your time and energy in helping them and giving them direction – good for you in mentoring them, but do they appreciate? No.  As if you never exist.  Ungrateful?  Maybe.  Forgetful? Maybe on purpose.  In short – they take, take, take but seldom think about how to give.

Lastly, Armenians never seem to follow but always want to lead.  Compromise doesn’t seem to exist in the vocabulary.  And as a result, you have 2 different Popes, a million different churches and all manners of political parties, organizations and charities. You have countless flavors of Armenians separated by where they are from and of course their children change flavors depending on where they travel to.  And none of them seem to want to cooperate, get along or acknowledge the other. Instead they are always bickering and always fighting.  It’s amazing that Armenians have survived for this long.

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BAND MEMBERS

 

Mihran Kalaydjian Elegant Element Band’s unique signature embodies the essence of World Music. The band’s distinctive arrangements preserve and popularize traditional Armenian songs by infusing each piece with large bodied vocals and a cool blend of instrumentals. The band’s original compositions resonate deeply with listeners’ yearning for nostalgia, or perhaps the old world through modern tones.

Mihran Kalaydjian Elegance performs traditional Armenian folk songs as well as more contemporary compositions laced with its own sensibilities, some of them distinctly non-Armenian. The band’s members are aligned in their determination to elevate their cultural heritage through music, while paying homage to South American and Mediterranean traditions—the band’s stylings are variously embossed with the sounds of Flamenco, Tango, Rembetika, as well as more contemporary influences. –Sam Ekizian/Critics’ Forum

Mihran’s orchestra is a truly unique collection of musicians. Mihran ” Mino” has hand picked each member of his musical band and has been in search for the world’s top performers to bring you what you see today. He refers to them as the “United Nations” as they come from all walks of life, backgrounds and experiences from all over the world. Mino brings you on a musical journey that only this group of musicians can attempt. The talents from each member surpass the imaginable, and they are all brought to you on one stage under the guidance of a true modern day orchestra

 

Aram Kasabian – Guitar Lead 

https://www.reverbnation.com/musician/aramkasabian

Aram Kassabian took an interest in guitar at a very young age but, in the absence of opportunities to study guitar formally in his hometown.

Aram Kasabian is an acoustic guitarist/composer & arranger with almost 20 years of professional playing experience. Born and raised in San Diego, Alex’s dad first showed him how to play his first bolero on the guitar when he was 12 years old. Ever since then, Aram has been hooked on the beautiful Spanish Sound!

Aram Kassabian took an interest in guitar at a very young age but, in the absence of opportunities to study guitar formally in his hometown.

Aram Kasabian is an acoustic guitarist/composer & arranger with almost 20 years of professional playing experience. Born and raised in San Diego, Aram’s dad first showed him how to play his first bolero on the guitar when he was 12 years old. Ever since then, Aram has been hooked on the beautiful Spanish Sound!

Aram Kasabian is a longtime San Diego city-based guitarist, singer/songwriter, producer, and bandleader.

He is the leader of the Aram Kasabian Trio Band and has been the guitarist of choice with the iconic band Steely Dan for both recording and touring since 1999. With the launch of Adult Entertainment.

 

Samer Khoury – Violin

www.reverbnation.com/samerkhoury

Violinist

One of the most versatile and charismatic violinists today, Samer Khoury is an exceptionally dedicated and gifted performer whose passionate artistry has been heard and embraced around the world. British violinist Samer Khoury has toured the world as a virtuoso soloist for many years. He appears as soloist with the world’s major orchestras and conductors, directs many ensembles from the violin, and plays chamber music in a wide variety of traditional and new venues. Samer Khoury is a violinist known for his ability to captivate audiences with his combination of virtuosity and sophistication.

 

Hratch Panossian, BASS

www.reverbnation.com/hratchpanossian

BASS

Hratch Panossian began his bass playing career as a teenager in upstate New York. He played in several bands throughout his teen years and in the 80’s, progressed to the Binghamton, NY based band, Acts. This was a very polished professional band that toured the entire east coast and consistently packed every venue played. They also recorded an album, “Fear of Swimming”, on which Hratch wrote and co-wrote songs. Hratch considers Acts his college band, because it really honed his stage and playing charisma.

Sevan Manoukian – Drums

www.reverbnation.com/Sevanmanoukian

Dummer

A magician is a performer who creates and stages illusions of impossible or supernatural feats through natural means. Like magicians, drummers have the power to illude an entire audience with as much ease but through the clever use of rhythm instead. With his rhythmic batons Sevan Manoukian has become one of the most skillful rhythmic illusionists of our time–a Houdini. Playing drum set felt so natural to him that Sevan Manoukian didn’t take long to decide he wanted to play professionally. To help him develop his chops, Sevan Manoukian’s father built him a wood shed in the backyard, inside which he nailed some mattresses to keep the noise down for the neighbors.

 

Tony Amer – Saxophone

www.reverbnation.com/musician/tonyamer

Saxophone

“Saxophonist Tony Amer is a subverted of the jazz form,” declares Elias Manah in his Irabagon feature in the August issue of The New York City Jazz Record. “He’s a revolutionary who’s secretly messing with the changes. He might be dismantling the music’s mechanics from the inside, but from the outside he can frequently persuade a crowd that he’s an old- school practitioner. There are few players who can so deftly stride from post-bop to free improvisation, Avant country to doom metal and then wander from chaotic collage-spraying to sleek-blowing fluency.”