Music

79 Songs About Soldiers and Veterans

There is a playlist for just about any situation and is on a mission to unite and entertain the world through song.

Make a playlist about soldiers and veterans to honor those who protect your liberty.  We have a long list of pop, rock, metal, and country songs to get you started.

Make a playlist about soldiers and veterans to honor those who protect your liberty. We have a long list of pop, rock, metal, and country songs to get you started. 

Soldiers Put It All on the Line for Freedom

Chances are that you have a veteran or active military member in your social network. But have you stopped to truly listen to their story and reflect on what their contributions mean to your freedom?

Men and women in uniform have put it all on the line for their country, setting aside their personal lives, often at great expense to their families and themselves. How often do you express your gratitude for their sacrifices?

Recognize veterans’ heroic contributions to preserving liberty and freedom with a custom playlist. Here’s a long list of pop, rock, and country songs about military personnel. You don’t have to wait until Veterans Day, Memorial Day, or Fourth of July to reflect on their heroism.

1. “For You” by Keith Urban

The soldier in this heartrending 2012 hit has a wife and an unborn child who wait for him at home. But in the heat of combat, with smoke, fire, and bullets flying, he doesn’t think twice about taking a bullet for his fellow soldier. He knows this sacrifice is his duty and that others would do the same for him. That’s the heroism of our men and women in uniform.

 

 

2. “American Soldier” by Toby Keith

Toby Keith drew fire from fans when he appeared at Donald Trump’s pre-inauguration concert at the Lincoln Memorial and sang this 2003 country hit. It describes an American soldier—a family man, a hard worker, steady, brave, honorable, and good under pressure. In answering critics, the singer noted that he had appeared at the inauguration events of both George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

3. “8th of November” by Big & Rich

This poignant 2005 country song tells the story of Niles Harris, a 19-year-old boy from Deadwood, South Dakota, who hugged his mother goodbye as he left home for the army to fight during the Vietnam War. Just a few months later, on November 8, 1965, he encountered an epic battle he would remember the rest of his life.

Forty-eight fellow soldiers died in combat that day, and Niles was left with shrapnel in his leg as a reminder of their sacrifice. Decades later, he still honors their service on the 8th of November by putting on a suit and tie.

In case you’re wondering … yes, Niles is indeed real.

4. “Wake Me Up When September Ends” by Green Day

In this haunting 2005 rock hit describing loss, the narrator is going through a difficult time and mourns his innocence. Although the song was written about the passing of Green Day lead lead singer’s father, its video depicts a couple separate by the Iraq War.

Studies suggest that among soldiers who served in Iraq and Afganistan, about one in five suffer post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).  Among Vietnam Era veterans, as many as 80% reported symptoms when interviewed 20-25 years after Vietnam.

Studies suggest that among soldiers who served in Iraq and Afganistan, about one in five suffer post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Among Vietnam Era veterans, as many as 80% reported symptoms when interviewed 20-25 years after Vietnam

5. “Warrior” by Kid Rock

The National Guard used this 2008 rock song by Kid Rock as a recruitment tool. It features a narrator who celebrates his status as a citizen soldier. He’s ready to go when liberty calls because he understands that freedom isn’t free.

6. “Indestructible” by Disturbed

Meant to be a battle anthem to encourage American soldiers and pump them up as they prepare for combat, this 2008 hard rock song is enough to make anyone feel unassailable. It speaks of no hesitation, a sworn duty to protect, and the honor of returning home victorious.

7. “Didn’t I” by Montgomery Gentry

The 2002 movie We Were Soldiers featured this moving country song on its soundtrack. The song describes a Vietnam era veteran who returns home from war only to face judgment and criticism instead of appreciation for his service.

Rhetorically, the veteran asks whether he burned and bled enough and endured enough physical and emotional pain to warrant a better homecoming. About 9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the Vietnam era (1964 to 1975). Many faced protests, indifference, and a dearth of resource assistance with reintegrating into American society after the war.

Veterans Day, celebrated November 11, honors service members both alive and deceased.  Memorial Day, celebrated the last Monday of May, honors military members who died while serving their country.

Veterans Day, celebrated November 11, honors service members both alive and deceased. Memorial Day, celebrated the last Monday of May, honors military members who died while serving their country.

8. “‘Til The Last Shot’s Fired” by Trace Adkins

This country song from 2008 commemorates soldiers from the American Civil War to World War II to Vietnam. The nature of the conflict may have been different, but the horror of war is the same. The narrator urges us all to say a prayer for peace.

9. “Brothers” by Dean Brody

Brothers can be counted on, although they don’t always express their emotions well verbally. That’s the message behind this tender 2009 country song that shares memories from the narrator’s childhood.

A young boy’s older brother is leaving for the military, and at first the child preferred not to say goodbye, thinking that he could deny his brother’s leaving away. At the last moment, the boy runs to his brother and offers to clean his room, give him his rookie Joe DiMaggio card, anything to prevent his departure.

Two years later, the soldier returns in a wheelchair and says that he’s sorry that his younger sibling has to push him home. The younger brother replies, “This is what brothers are for.

10. “Fortunate Son” by Creedence Clearwater Revival

Recognized by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant,” this seminal 1969 rock song is also one of Rolling Stonemagazine’s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”

During the Vietnam era, “Fortunate Son” was an anti-war anthem that was used to express rebuke for people who supported war but didn’t have to bear its burdens, either financially or by serving. About three-fourths of the military personnel who served in Vietnam were from lower middle/working class backgrounds.

11. “Citizen Soldier” by 3 Doors Down

This 2007 rock song pays tribute to the National Guard:

Hope and pray that you’ll never need me,
But rest assured I will not let you down.
I’ll walk beside you but you may not see me,
The strongest among you may not wear a crown.

It was used as a part of the National Guard’s recruiting campaign and references the vital role that the Guard plays in both homeland security and national defense.

America’s citizen soldiers may be activated to respond to natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, and wildfires. They may also be deployed to help when peace is threatened by riots, civil unrest and terrorist events.

12. “The Pride” by Five Finger Death Punch

This high energy 2011 metal song conveys an American soldier’s strength, pride, and unwavering readiness to defend, whatever the cost. In rapid succession, the song lists many iconic elements of American culture to represent all that a soldier protects when he or she serves our country. Our freedom, values and way of life hangs in the balance when troops are called to defend our country.

13. “Diamond Eyes (Boom-Lay Boom-Lay Boom)” by Shinedown

Written for the 2010 movie The Expendables, this rock song expresses the intensity of being on the front line of combat. With nothing to lose, a soldier operates on sheer adrenaline and a “fist first” mentality, thinking quickly in a brutal high-stakes battle.

14. “Letters From Home” by John Michael Montgomery

Sometimes simple things such as letters can do wonders to boost soldier morale. In this 2004 country song, a young soldier receives a letter from his mother about the details of everyday life back at home. He also gets a love letter from his fiance and a brief letter from his stoic dad that shares how proud he is of his son. Each helps to spur him on amidst the terrible uncertainty that is war.

15. “Hey Brother” by Avicci

This 2013 pop song expresses the devotion felt between siblings and others who still feel intensely connected when one of them is far away. Although separated by distance, they sense when the other is lonely or in danger:

Oh, if the sky comes falling down, for you
There’s nothing in this world I wouldn’t do.

16. “Courtesy Of The Red, White And Blue (The Angry American)” by Toby Keith

After 9/11, this country song became a rousing anthem for the guys and gals in uniform. Full of bravado, the 2002 song features a narrator fondly recalling his war hero father. Then he launches into a promise of American vengeance for the sucker punch terrorist attack on 9/11:

Justice will be served
And the battle will rage
This big dog will fight
When you rattle his cage
And you’ll be sorry that you messed with
The U.S. of A.
`Cause we`ll put a boot in your a*s
It`s the American way

17. “Some Gave All” by Billy Ray Cyrus

The narrator in this touching 1992 country hit recalls a friend who matured dramatically after his combat experiences. The friend remarked that when you think of your liberty, think of him as well as other veterans. The veteran explained to the narrator that “All gave some; some gave all

Fifteen U.S. Presidents have not served in the military:  Trump, Obama, Clinton, FDR, Hoover, Coolidge, Harding, Wilson, Taft, Cleveland, Fillmore, Van Buren, John Quincy Adams, Jefferson, and John Adams.

Fifteen U.S. Presidents have not served in the military: Trump, Obama, Clinton, FDR, Hoover, Coolidge, Harding, Wilson, Taft, Cleveland, Fillmore, Van Buren, John Quincy Adams, Jefferson, and John Adams.

18. “Heaven Was Needing a Hero” by Jo Dee Messina

In this 2010 country song, the sweetheart of a fallen soldier visits his grave. Although she always told him that he wouldn’t be called home until it was his time, she justifies his untimely death as due to heaven’s needing a hero.

The Veterans Administration estimates that over 7% of all living Americans has served in the military at some point in their lives.

The Veterans Administration estimates that over 7% of all living Americans has served in the military at some point in their lives.

19. “Letters from the Garden of Stone” by Everlast

A combat soldier sits by the moonlight readying himself for battle at daylight in this 2008 rock song. At first, he shows little emotion about what he has to do — kill or be killed. He tries to push back thoughts of family members, however the more their memories begin to creep in, the more he questions whether he’s doing the right thing fighting.

20. “The Other Little Soldier” by Josh Gracin

Feel the lump in your throat form as you listen to this country tune from 2004. It describes a small boy who plays dress up in his dad’s military uniform. Even though he doesn’t have the maturity to understand what his father is fighting for, the child is proud and wants to grow up just like his role model.

When Uncle Sam calls his dad to combat, sadly, his dad returns in a flag-draped casket. The little boy gives his father one last goodbye salute. This child represents the legion of military family members who also make sacrifices in wartime and in peace

There are seven uniformed branches of the U.S. military:  Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

There are seven uniformed branches of the U.S. military: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

Even More Songs About Soldiers and Veterans

Song
Artist
Year Released
21. Travelin’ Soldier
Dixie Chicks
2002
22. Riding with Private Malone
David Ball
2001
23. Goodnight Saigon
Billy Joel
1982
24. I Want You to Live
George Canyon
2007
25. If I Don’t Make It Back
Tracy Lawrence
2005
26. If You’re Reading This
Tim McGraw
2007
27. Arlington
Trace Adkins
2005
28. Come Home Soon
SHeDaisy
2004
29. 50,000 Names Carved in the Wall
George Jones
2001
30. Belleau Wood
Garth Brooks
1997
31. I Just Came Back (from a War)
Darryl Worley
2006
32. Soldiers and Jesus
James Otto
2010
33. I Drive Your Truck
Lee Brice
2012
34. The Ballad of the Green Berets
Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler
1966
35. Remember the Heroes
Sammy Hagar
1982
36. Sam Stone
John Prine
1971
37. Who You’d Be Today
Kenny Chesney
2005
38. One Hell of an Amen
Brantley Gilbert
2014
39. Fallen Soldier
Nathan Fair
2013
40. Once I Was
Tim Buckley
1967
41. Orange Crush
R.E.M.
1988
42. I Was Only 19
Redgum
1983
43. Still a Soldier
Trace Adkins
2017
44. Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town
Kenny Rogers and The First Edition
1969
45. War Is Hell (On the Homefront Too)
T.G. Sheppard
1982
46. More Than a Name on a Wall
The Statler Brothers
1989
47. Castle of Glass
Linkin Park
2013
48. Wrong Side of Heaven
Five Finger Death Punch
2013
49. Rooster
Alice in Chains
1993
50. For Whom the Bell Tolls
Metallica
1984
51. I Remember (It’s Happening Again)
Griffin House
2008
52. Camoflague
Stan Ridgway
1986
53. Just a Dream
Carrie Underwood
2008
54. 19
Paul Hardcastle
1985
55. Soldier Boy
The Shirelles
1962
56. Airborne
Nina Lee
2017
57. Dress Blues
Zac Brown Band
2015
58. People Back Home
Florida Georgia Line
2012
59. If Not Me
Craig Morgan
2013
60. In the Navy
Village People
1979
61. Navy Blue
Diane Renay
1963
62. Mother’s Pride
George Michael
1990
63. Walking on a This Line
Huey Lewis
1984
64. Home of the Brave
Toto
1988
65. In My Blood
Black Stone Cherry
2011
66. Dear John
Producers
1982
67. Your Heart Belongs to Me
The Supremes
1962
68. Pass the Ammo
Moonshine Bandits
2015
69. American Pride
Moonshine Bandits
2011
70. Letters from Home
Mark Schultz
2014
71. Angel Flight
Radney Foster and the Confessions
2009
72. Hero Of War
Rise Against
2009
73. Out of Harm’s Way
Journey
2005
74. The Ballad of Penny Evans
Steve Goodman
1976
75. Soldiers
Otherwise
2012
76. Gunslinger
Avenged Sevenfold
2007
77. Stop When You See a Uniform
Buddy Brown
2013
78. An Honor to Serve
Ray Boltz
1998
79. Two Soldiers Coming Home
Lori McKenna
2012

 

Why are musicians more likely to suffer from depression?

Creative artists are fifth in the top 10 professions with high rates of depressive illness. But does depression attract them to the job? Or does the job make them depressed?

Health.com recently published a top 10 of professions with the highest rate of depression– one chart most artists wouldn’t want to be on. However, people working in the arts are fifth most likely to suffer from depression, with around 9% of them reporting a major depressive episode in the previous year. It appears carving out a career as a musician isn’t just perilous when it comes to earning a living – it can also cause damage to your physical and mental health. Musicians supplementing their income by waiting tables would rate even higher on the chart, as food service staff are second most prone to depression.

You know it the second you hear the first notes. It’s that one special song that makes your spine tingle. You can feel the tears welling up in your eyes.

How does that happen? Only seven notes can come together to form a soul-moving melody that can break your heart, make you cry, and bring back buried, long-forgotten memories.

Music is powerful.

 

Image result for depression photo

1. Music helps you work through your problems

Often during your darkest nights, you can’t find a way through the muddy alleyways of your mind. Good news! Don’t just lie there, turn on Google play and let the music flow into you. If you cry, that’s OK. Tears represent feelings that must be expressed. Feeling is healing.

Music helps you express your emotions. It’s melodic encouragement that helps you let go of suppressed feelings. A study published in the British Journal showed that music is cathartic, especially drumming. You didn’t need a medical study to prove that. You discovered that yourself when you were a 4 year-old banging on your mother’s pots and pans.

2. Music inspires creativity

Do you need to write a blog, run faster on the treadmill, or design a new website but can’t because you’re feeling uninspired? Pump up the jam. Music will motivate you. Go ahead, try to sit still while listening to Avicii sing Wake Me Up, it’s just not possible.

Finnish researchers found that the mind-wandering mode goes into action when your brain processes a song, thus inspiring creativity. These rewards don’t only happen to artists: Techies also benefit from the relaxing effect of music.

Professor Gold (one of the Finnish researchers) who conducted the study said, “Our trial has shown that music therapy, when added to standard care including medication, psychotherapy and counseling, helps people to improve their levels of depression and anxiety. Music therapy has specific qualities that allow people to express themselves and interact in a non-verbal way – even in situations when they cannot find the words to describe their inner experiences.”

3. Music affects your breathing

Music has the power to speed up your heartbeats or slow down your breathing. Musicians beware! You respond differently than the rest of us.

Anyone can feel the music. Your foot starts tapping as your body sways from side to side. Who hasn’t been to a concert when you felt the bass beating in your chest? There is scientific proof behind it.

A slow, meditative tempo has a relaxing effect slowing your heart rate and breathing while faster music with an upbeat tempo speeds up your heart rate and respiration.

You are can be in charge of your body, simply by choosing which songs you listen to. Next time you’re feeling anxious, when your heart starts to race, grab your headset and listen to Zen Garden.

4. Music can reduce blood pressure

Here’s the prescription: Listen to classical, Celtic or reggae music 30 minutes a day to lower your blood pressure. According to the American Society of Hypertension, research shows this simple prescription might significantly reduce high blood pressure.

In a report from Dr. Peter Sleight at the University of Oxford, research has shown “music can alleviate stress, improve athletic performance, improve movement in neurologically impaired patients with stroke or Parkinson’s disease, and even boost milk production in cattle.”

Don’t throw away your medication yet, but music is certainly an easier pill to take.


5. Music is used to treat addiction

Music therapy can be of great value in treating addiction. It is certainly not enough by itself to help someone recover from substance abuse, but it can be a useful tool in the treatment process.

Addiction is a painful disease that affects the entire family and circle of friends. Making the decision to enter rehab is the first step towards recovery. Help is available and new methods of treatment are continually being discovered.

Thamkrabok is a Buddhist temple in Thailand offering free treatment to for addiction. Music plays an important role at the temple because of its therapeutic powers. The monks of Thamkrabok even have their own recording studio.  Tim Arnold, the UK musician made a whole album there.

Sobriety is an emotional roller coaster. Music (either playing it or listening to it) may help people get rid of some of their destructive emotions.

6. Music might prevent suicide

The sound of music is incredibly powerful. It can even prevent suicide.

IN 1997, DMC aka Darrell McDaniels, of Run DMC, was at the top of the charts. While touring he fell into a negative downward spiral, thinking Is this all there is?

He was serious. At that moment, he made a decision to commit suicide when he got home.

Staring at the walls in a cold hotel room, Sarah McLachlan’s song “Angel” came on the radio. You know it’s power. It makes you cry and want to run out and adopt one of those sad animals in the SPCA commercial.

It’s hard to believe, but that song changed his suicide plan. He became a huge fan of Sarah McLachlan. Soon after, he found out he was adopted, which gave his life new meaning.

After DMC trashed his suicide plan, he made a new plan to use his music and fame to decided to promote adoption and help foster kids. He even made a documentary to promote his worthy cause.

7. Music in the operating room

Did you know doctors have a specific playlist for different types of surgery?

 Anthony Youn, M.D. cites a study published in “Surgical Endoscopy” that found classical music affected surgeons more positively than hard rock or heavy metal.

Oddly, another study published by “Surgical Innovation” noted surgeons’ performances benefitted most from hip-hop and reggae the music. Go figure!

Dr. Youn says, “It probably comes down to taste, with surgeons finding comfort and inspiration working to the music they like to hear.”

Doctors aren’t the only ones affected. Several studies show that patients appear more relaxed, require less anesthesia, and recover quicker when physicians play tunes in the OR.

Nearly 80% of operating room support staff believed music had a positive effect on their work as well. I wonder if the remaining 20% wear noise-cancelling headphones.

Who knows what the future of the OR will bring? Maybe there’ll be a DJ taking requests for your favorite spins.

8.  Music reduces pain

Whether it’s Sam Smith, Lady Gaga, or Jason Mraz, the lyrics and melodies they write and sing can be effective therapy for managing pain. According to a paper in the UK-based Journal of Advanced Nursing, listening to music can reduce chronic pain from a range of painful conditions, including osteoarthritis, disc problems and rheumatoid arthritis, by up to 21%. That’s a lot when you’re hurting.

Music is a distraction that gives the patient a sense of control. Music causes the body to release endorphins, which counteract pain.

9. Music jars your memory

Beware: Handle music with care. Some songs put you in a time machine and set you back to painful times. Hopefully, when you get there, you will remember the lessons you learned, see how much you have grown and how much better you are doing since leaving those sad times behind you. Leaving those memories allows you to open your heart to new adventures.

So next time you make your playlist, choose carefully, those songs are going deep into your soul. They might inspire you to create a new start-up, stop drinking so much, become a triathete, or fall in love.

There’s no doubt about it. Those seven notes can change your life.

 

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BAND MEMBERS

 

Mihran Kalaydjian Elegant Element Band’s unique signature embodies the essence of World Music. The band’s distinctive arrangements preserve and popularize traditional Armenian songs by infusing each piece with large bodied vocals and a cool blend of instrumentals. The band’s original compositions resonate deeply with listeners’ yearning for nostalgia, or perhaps the old world through modern tones.

Mihran Kalaydjian Elegance performs traditional Armenian folk songs as well as more contemporary compositions laced with its own sensibilities, some of them distinctly non-Armenian. The band’s members are aligned in their determination to elevate their cultural heritage through music, while paying homage to South American and Mediterranean traditions—the band’s stylings are variously embossed with the sounds of Flamenco, Tango, Rembetika, as well as more contemporary influences. –Sam Ekizian/Critics’ Forum

Mihran’s orchestra is a truly unique collection of musicians. Mihran ” Mino” has hand picked each member of his musical band and has been in search for the world’s top performers to bring you what you see today. He refers to them as the “United Nations” as they come from all walks of life, backgrounds and experiences from all over the world. Mino brings you on a musical journey that only this group of musicians can attempt. The talents from each member surpass the imaginable, and they are all brought to you on one stage under the guidance of a true modern day orchestra

 

Aram Kasabian – Guitar Lead 

https://www.reverbnation.com/musician/aramkasabian

Aram Kassabian took an interest in guitar at a very young age but, in the absence of opportunities to study guitar formally in his hometown.

Aram Kasabian is an acoustic guitarist/composer & arranger with almost 20 years of professional playing experience. Born and raised in San Diego, Alex’s dad first showed him how to play his first bolero on the guitar when he was 12 years old. Ever since then, Aram has been hooked on the beautiful Spanish Sound!

Aram Kassabian took an interest in guitar at a very young age but, in the absence of opportunities to study guitar formally in his hometown.

Aram Kasabian is an acoustic guitarist/composer & arranger with almost 20 years of professional playing experience. Born and raised in San Diego, Aram’s dad first showed him how to play his first bolero on the guitar when he was 12 years old. Ever since then, Aram has been hooked on the beautiful Spanish Sound!

Aram Kasabian is a longtime San Diego city-based guitarist, singer/songwriter, producer, and bandleader.

He is the leader of the Aram Kasabian Trio Band and has been the guitarist of choice with the iconic band Steely Dan for both recording and touring since 1999. With the launch of Adult Entertainment.

 

Samer Khoury – Violin

www.reverbnation.com/samerkhoury

Violinist

One of the most versatile and charismatic violinists today, Samer Khoury is an exceptionally dedicated and gifted performer whose passionate artistry has been heard and embraced around the world. British violinist Samer Khoury has toured the world as a virtuoso soloist for many years. He appears as soloist with the world’s major orchestras and conductors, directs many ensembles from the violin, and plays chamber music in a wide variety of traditional and new venues. Samer Khoury is a violinist known for his ability to captivate audiences with his combination of virtuosity and sophistication.

 

Hratch Panossian, BASS

www.reverbnation.com/hratchpanossian

BASS

Hratch Panossian began his bass playing career as a teenager in upstate New York. He played in several bands throughout his teen years and in the 80’s, progressed to the Binghamton, NY based band, Acts. This was a very polished professional band that toured the entire east coast and consistently packed every venue played. They also recorded an album, “Fear of Swimming”, on which Hratch wrote and co-wrote songs. Hratch considers Acts his college band, because it really honed his stage and playing charisma.

Sevan Manoukian – Drums

www.reverbnation.com/Sevanmanoukian

Dummer

A magician is a performer who creates and stages illusions of impossible or supernatural feats through natural means. Like magicians, drummers have the power to illude an entire audience with as much ease but through the clever use of rhythm instead. With his rhythmic batons Sevan Manoukian has become one of the most skillful rhythmic illusionists of our time–a Houdini. Playing drum set felt so natural to him that Sevan Manoukian didn’t take long to decide he wanted to play professionally. To help him develop his chops, Sevan Manoukian’s father built him a wood shed in the backyard, inside which he nailed some mattresses to keep the noise down for the neighbors.

 

Tony Amer – Saxophone

www.reverbnation.com/musician/tonyamer

Saxophone

“Saxophonist Tony Amer is a subverted of the jazz form,” declares Elias Manah in his Irabagon feature in the August issue of The New York City Jazz Record. “He’s a revolutionary who’s secretly messing with the changes. He might be dismantling the music’s mechanics from the inside, but from the outside he can frequently persuade a crowd that he’s an old- school practitioner. There are few players who can so deftly stride from post-bop to free improvisation, Avant country to doom metal and then wander from chaotic collage-spraying to sleek-blowing fluency.”